How Perioperative Nurses Prevent Pressure Ulcers

As a nurse, it is our jobs to make sure that every patient gets the best treatment. Especially, for perioperative nurses which important to put more attention on their patient. Due to immobile situation, patients are put in extreme positions which can cause them from getting any pressure ulcers. Pressure ulcer is painful and sometimes hard to heal which can affect patient’s day-to-day life. This is why preventing patient from getting any pressure ulcers is part of nursing jobs. Learn more on how to prevent pressure ulcers below!

Taking Precautions
The preventive action can be started by providing a high specification OR mattress with more than three inches of foam. Some patients even need a gel pad atop that. Moreover, as a nurse you may need to pad patients to relieve them from pressure. In fact, some people will require a foam dressing for the sacrum, elbow and other vulnerable areas.

Due to this, as a nurse, you need to check patient’s skin before going into the OR. If there are any pressure ulcers found, nurses on the units should report the incident to perioperative nurses.

Changing Processes
To change the process, one should know the ulcers occur. Due to this, nurses in the OR should position patients on gel pads or other specialty mattresses to offload pressure on body parts that cannot be moved or floated during surgery. Moreover, period nurses also may use Mepilex heel dressings, if patients cannot be positioned to have their heels floated.

Special Pillows and Mattresses
In order to prevent any occiput pressure, patients may be placed on a fluidized positioning pillow in the ICU. Special mattresses are prepared for patients to offload pressure. A study has been conducted to monitor the incidence of pressure ulcers by offloading the pressure. The study shows good results, it comes with zero pressure ulcers on the day of survey for 11 months.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s